Audiobook Review Dump Volume 2

I keep moving through audiobooks like the wind. No complaints though — with how busy my life has been lately I love that I am still able to get some reading in via audiobook. Below are four different books that I listened to recently. As usual, I love picking up a variety of books and books by marginalized authors which is absolutely reflected in today’s audiobook review dump. Let me know what you are currently listening to!

As usual, I love picking up a variety of books and books by marginalized authors which is absolutely reflected in today's audiobook review dump.

30 Things I Love About Myself by Radhika Sanghani

[book-info]

I genuinely enjoyed 30 Things I Love About Myself by Radhika Sanghani. Nina Mistry has somehow started her thirtieth birthday in a jail cell after being picked up at a protest she just happened to accidentally be a part of. While in the cell, Nina realizes she doesn’t really have anyone to call. Somehow, she ends up reading this book called How To Fix Your Shitty Life By Loving Yourself which propels her on a journey of self love. Also, Nina challenges herself to find 30 things she loves about herself by her next birthday. Along the way, Nina has to confront truths about her family and her past. She also learns to gain confidence and be okay with her self as she moves her life forward — making plenty of mistakes along the way.

Nina is a British Indian woman and her culture happens to play a decent role in 30 Things I Love About Myself. I found Nina so interesting and likable. She was a dynamic character on an interesting journey. Parts of this book were quite funny too. Also, a little awkward — as you might expect. The audiobook was great as well. It is narrated by Radhika Sanghani and I was surprised how much I liked it. Normally I am not one for author narrated audiobooks, but Sanghani had such a charming way of narrating, I think she could be a professional narrator. Overall, this was a lovely surprise of an uplifting read. I very much enjoyed this book.


The Fastest Way To Fall by Denise Williams

[book-info number=”1″]

Denise Williams is quickly becoming one of my must read contemporary authors. I just love the way she writes and turns a phrase and how she does characterization. The Fastest Way To Fall is a stupendous read starring a plus sized woman and a fitness coach. Britta is a writer and as part of her work, begins testing a new body positivity fitness app. She is paired with a coach named Wes. Somehow the two end up continuously chatting and they go from fitness to flirting. The way they meet in real life was harrowing, I guess I would say. OH and even though this book has strong fitness themes, it is absolutely not about Britta losing weight and her life becoming better because of that. Actually, she doesn’t really lose weight, just gets more stamina with running and more confident in herself.

Okay, so yes, I LOVED The Fastest Way To Fall. I felt like Wes was such a kind and thoughtful love interest. His approach to fitness and health came across as caring and safe. And Wes and Britta together were PERFECTION. I loved the journey that Britta went on to think better of herself and to not accept being treated as lesser than. Oh and the audiobook of this was narrated to perfection. The narrators are N’Jameh Camara and Teddy Hamilton who are perfect in their roles. I find that I am eyeing this one at the store and am likely to just buy this for my personal collection ASAP.


Black Boy Joy edited by Kwame Mbalia

[book-info number=”2″]

I love that the anthology Black Boy Joy edited by Kwame Mbalia exists. When I think about books as mirrors and who typically gets left out and maybe doesn’t see themselves in books, it is Black boys. So, this book is an awesome start to meeting that need. It is comprised of seventeen short stories written around the theme of Black Boy Joy — as the title states. And the authors of these stories are heavy hitters.

So, if you want to pick up more books by Black men but aren’t sure where to start, this book is an amazing sampler. I loved that the stories did not center around trauma, but instead changes the narrative and adds nuance to stories about Black boys. The audiobook has two narrators who go back and forth with the stories — Amir Abdullah and Taj Leahy. Both are solid narrators and make the six hours and twenty nine minutes of this audiobook an absolute treat to listen to. This book is a must for any middle school classroom library or school library.


Call Us What We Carry by Amanda Gorman

[book-info number=”3″]

I will never forget watching Amanda Gorman read her poem The Hill We Climb on TV during the Inauguration. Talk about awe inspiring. So, I was very eager to listen to Call Us What We Carry. After all, poetry holds a very special place in my heart and Gorman is now a part of history. Call Us What We Carry was an interesting book of poetry.

There was some playing with form which was pretty cool — especially the use of primary sources and reinterpreting those sources. The audiobook is three hours and thirty one minutes. Honestly, I felt like at times the narration came across as a little monotone. I did zone out a lot. However, I have also had so much on my mind that it has been hard to concentrate. I do think that if I decide to re-read Call Us What We Carry, it will be the print or ebook version.


The following two tabs change content below.
April is in her 30s and created Good Books And Good Wine. She works for a non-profit. April always has a book on hand. In her free time she can be found binge watching The Office with her husband and toddler, spending way too much time on Pinterest or exploring her neighborhood.

Latest posts by April (Books&Wine) (see all)

About April (Books&Wine)

April is in her 30s and created Good Books And Good Wine. She works for a non-profit. April always has a book on hand. In her free time she can be found binge watching The Office with her husband and toddler, spending way too much time on Pinterest or exploring her neighborhood.

%d bloggers like this: